E-mail alert  |  Contact  
Search:       Go  
Background  |   Sponsoring institutions  |   Editorial board   |   Advisory board   |   Associate editors
Call for papers  |   Submission guidelines  |   Editorial process
Current issue  |   Past issues  |  
May 2005 issue
List of authors
 
Svensson
Gürkaynak, Sack, Swanson
Adalid, Coenen, McAdam and Siviero
Nelson
Lombardelli, Proudman and Talbot
Caballero and Krishnamurthy
IJCB Home   Read the journal   Past issues
Past issues
2017
 
December
September
June
March
February
2016
 
December
September
June
March
2015
 
December
September
June
March
January
2014
 
December
September
June
March
2013
 
December
September
June
March
January
2012
 
December
September
June
March
January
2011
 
December
September
June
March
2010
 
December
September
June
March
2009
 
December
September
June
March
2008
 
December
September
June
March
2007
 
December
September
June
March
2006
 
December
September
June
March
2005
 
December
September
May

Monetary Policy with Judgment: Forecast Targeting

by Lars E O Svensson
Princeton University

Abstract

"Forecast targeting", forward-looking monetary policy that uses central-bank judgment to construct optimal policy projections of the target variables and the instrument rate, may perform substantially better than monetary policy that disregards judgment and follows a given instrument rule. This is demonstrated in a few examples for two empirical models of the U.S. economy, one forward looking and one backward looking. A complicated infinite-horizon central-bank projection model of the economy can be closely approximated by a simple finite system of linear equations, which is easily solved for the optimal policy projections. Optimal policy projections corresponding to the optimal policy under commitment in a timeless perspective can easily be constructed. The whole projection path of the instrument rate is more important than the current instrument setting. The resulting reduced-form reaction function for the current instrument rate is a very complex function of all inputs in the monetary-policy decision process, including the central bank’s judgment. It cannot be summarized as a simple reaction function such as a Taylor rule. Fortunately, it need not be made explicit.

JEL Codes: E42, E52, E58.

 
Full article (PDF, 54 pages 369 kb)
Appendix to the article (PDF, 28 pages 378 kb)